Skip to main content

You are here

Eclectus Parrot

Green for boys, red for girls

The difference between male and female Eclectus Parrots meant European explorers first thought they were two different species.

Description: The Eclectus Parrot is unique among parrots in that males and females have distinctly different colours of their plumage. Females are mostly bright red with a darker hue on their back and wings, while males are predominantly bright green. Males have beaks with a yellow-orange upper mandible and a black lower mandible, while the beak of females is all black.

Diet: Eclectus Parrots mainly eat fruits, wild figs and unripe nuts.

In the wild: Female Eclectus Parrots nest in hollows of large rainforest trees and defend them vigorously, remaining at her nest for up to 11 months of the year and rarely straying from the entrance to her hollow. Males can travel up to 20km to forage for food which is then regurgitated for the female while she cares for her young.

Threats: Deforestation is a major threat for Eclectus Parrots as it clears their tree hollows and food sources. They are sometimes considered pests by farmers as they eat their fruit crops. 

Did you know?

The Eclectus Parrot is unique among parrots in that males and females have distinctly different coloured feathers: females are mostly bright red, while males are predominantly bright green.

Precinct
Tropical Birds
Scientific name
Eclectus roratus
Conservation status
Least Concern
Body length
Approximately 35 cm
Class
Bird
Incubation
28-30 days
Number of eggs
2
Distribution
Northern Australia, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands
Habitat
Tropical rainforest
Region
Asia
Australia