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Black Cockatoo Project

Perth Zoo’s veterinary hospital has treated hundreds of injured wild black cockatoos, with some going on to be rehabilitated and released back into the wild. Perth Zoo is also involved in research into the health of wild black cockatoos.

How Does Perth Zoo Help Save the Black Cockatoos?

There are three species of black cockatoo found in south-west Western Australia. Two of these, the Baudin’s and Carnaby’s Cockatoos, are endangered. Black Cockatoos have a very low rate of reproduction which means the population cannot quickly replace numbers lost.

When injured wild black cockatoos are found, wildlife officers from the Department of Parks and Wildlife bring the birds to Perth Zoo’s veterinary hospital for assessment and treatment. Many of the birds have been hit by cars, others have been shot. The cockatoos are provided with emergency treatment, surgery when necessary and intensive medical care.

Following initial treatment, the cockatoo stays in the veterinary hospital for as long as necessary, which can be anything from one day to several weeks. They are then handed over to Parks and Wildlife-accredited black cockatoo rehabilitators where they continue their rehabilitation and, if possible, are released back into the wild. Often they are released into the same area and flock from where they came.

In addition, Perth Zoo is involved in research into the health of wild black cockatoos. This research has included a doctoral research project undertaken by a Perth Zoo resident veterinarian identified baseline health parameters for black cockatoos, investigations into the use of satellite tracking technology to monitor individual birds in the wild, and biochemical techniques for determining the age structure of wild cockatoo populations.

What Does My Donation Go Towards?

One hundred percent of your tax deductible donation will help protect wildlife as Perth Zoo covers all administration costs. General donations to Perth Zoo help us in our goal towards saving wildlife including through wildlife rehabilitation and research and our Native Species Breeding Program.

Learn more about Forest Red-tailed Cockatoos here.